Psychology 2301: Introduction to Psychology (adapted from Dr. Jennifer Suarez)

 


Instructor:       Asso Prof. Doan Van Dieu

Phone:             08 7515745 before 9 pm

Email:              doanvandieu@gmail.com

 

 

Term:                           Summer 2008

Course Number:          PSYC 2301

Class Times:                Wed. & Fri.: 7-9.40 am

Room Number:            


 Course Description

PSYC 2301 is a survey course of the basic principles underlying human behavior. Emphasis is placed on major areas of study in the field of psychology, such as learning, memory, personality, health and stress, child and adult development, and psychological disorders. This course transfers as three (3) hours of credit to most other colleges and universities. Upon completion of this course, you should:

(1) Recognize the key role that psychology plays in our everyday lives.

(2) Have a better insight into the behavior of individuals with whom you have frequent contact in your life.

(3) Have a more accurate and comprehensive understanding of human behavior in general.

(4) Be more aware of the major issues in at least nine subject areas of psychology.

(5) Have some understanding of the scientific method and how it applies to psychological research.

 

Required Text

James W Kalat (2001). Introduction to Psychology, 6th Edition, Thomson Learning.
Supplementary material: Weiten, W., Lloyd, M. (2003).
Psychology applied to modern life: Adjustment in the 21st Century. Seventh edition. Thomson / Wadsworth Publishing Company.

 

Both the textbook and the Student Supplementary Handbook listed above are required in this course. The Student Supplementary Handbook contains Learning Objective Questions and Key Terms for each of the core chapters or modules that will be covered in the comprehensive Final Exam. It is a guide for your preparation for class and the final exam. It is available on the learning web.

 

Classroom Activity

A wide variety of classroom techniques will be used, including lecture, discussion, active responding, audio-visuals, demonstrations, and involvement activities. Although the topic for each day will reflect material included in the assigned readings, the format will differ from session to session, and it will focus on active learning. Sometimes the instructor will lecture on particularly complex topics, but at other times you may be asked to master sections of the text on your own.

 

Use the Learning Objective Questions and the Key Terms in the Student Supplementary Handbook as your guide to determine which material is most important. Please note that the instructor may require modules or topics other than those in the Student Supplementary Handbook.

 

**Use of recording devices, including camera phones and tape recorders, is prohibited in classrooms, laboratories, faculty offices, and other locations where instruction, tutoring, or testing occurs. 

 

Scholastic Honesty

I expect academic honesty. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on tests, plagiarism, and collusion. College regulations prohibit cheating and plagiarism in connection with course work and provide severe penalties for violations of this prohibition. The penalty for any act of academic dishonesty will be a “0” on any test/assignment on which academic dishonesty occurred. There will be NO TOLERANCE for such activity.

 

Grade Assessment

Your final course grade will be calculated according to the following formula:

 


            Midterm Exam                                                            30%

            Written Assignments                                                  20%

            Final Exam                                                                  50%

            _______________________________________________

            Total                                                                          100%


All work will be scored 0-100. The final percentage value resulting from the sum of the above components will be converted into a letter grade according to the following scale:

 

A = 90-100% B = 80-89% C = 70-79% D = 60-69% F = Below 60%

 

Exams

The Midterm exam will consist of 50 multiple-choice items. Most will be selected from the text, but a few may come from class activities and lectures. Completion of the student supplement material will be worth 10 points on each exam. BE ON TIME FOR EXAMS as once the first exam has completed, no more exams will be allowed to begin and you will have missed the exam.

Final Exam

The final exam is comprehensive and is made up of 100 multiple choice questions. The student supplemental handbook should be used as a study guide for this exam.

THERE ARE NO MAKE-UP EXAMS!! Plan to take all tests at the scheduled time. However, if you miss an exam, your comprehensive final exam will count twice (once for the final and once for the missed exam). There will be no make-up exams for the final exam.

Written Assignments

Short Papers- One of the requirements for this course includes writing short papers relating incidents in your life to the material within your textbook.  For each of the exams, you will relate one topic discussed with a personal situation you have experienced. The short papers will be due on the day of each exam.  Papers turned in late will lose 10 points per class period. No paper will be accepted more than one class period late. No work will be accepted via email. Each short paper will receive a separate grade. Your short paper grades will be averaged to come up with your final “written assignment” grade. The criteria used for grading include the following:

1. CONTENT: Did you select a topic from the module and correctly relate it to personal experience? (75 points)

2. FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS: Did you write approximately 1-3 pages typed per journal? Did you set appropriate margins & font? (25 points)

(SEE JOURNAL ASSIGNMENT SHEET FOR MORE INFORMATION)

Attendance

Absences of each student are recorded. Class attendance is crucial to the successful completion of this course.  It is the students’ responsibility to obtain materials missed in the case of an absence. Students may be dropped for excessive absences.

 

Learning Web

You can access the HCCS Learning Web at the following address: http://learning.swc.hccs.edu/

It is at this address that you can access my homepage to print additional copies of your syllabus, print PowerPoints for each chapter, print out assignments, and to read class announcements. I suggest visiting this site at least twice a week as any changes to syllabus or assignments will be posted there.

 

Core Competencies

Reading at the college level means having the ability to analyze and interpret a variety of printed materials, books, and documents.

Writing- at the college level means having the ability to produce clear, correct, and coherent prose adapted to purpose, occasion, and audience. In addition to knowing correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation, students should also become familiar with the writing process, including how to discover a topic, how to develop and organize it, and how to phrase it effectively for their audience.

Listening at the college level means the ability to analyze and interpret various forms of spoken communication.

Critical Thinking embraces methods for applying both qualitative and quantitative skills analytically and creatively to subject matter in order to evaluate arguments and to construct alternative strategies. Problem solving is one of the applications of critical thinking used to address an identified task.

Computer Literacy at the college level means having the ability to use computer-based technology in communicating, solving problems, and acquiring information. Core-educated students should have an understanding of the limits, problems, and possibilities associated with the use of technology and should have the tools necessary to evaluate and learn new technologies as they become available.

 

SAIGONTECH

COURSE CALENDAR - SUMMER 2008

PSYC-A PSYC 2301 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

AT  Bld. 6 QUANG TRUNG CAMPUS 

Mon., June 16, 2008 - Sat., August 23, 2008

Week #

From

To

Chapter

Activity or Material to be Covered

1

7.00

9.40

June 18

 

Introduction to Course: Syllabus

7.00

9.40

June 20

1

Introduction & Research Methods

2

7.00

9.40

June 25

1

Introduction & Research Methods

7.00

9.40

June 27

2

 Neuroscience and Behavior

3

7.00

9.40

July 02

2

Neuroscience and Behavior (cont.)

7.00

9.40

July 04

5

Learning

4

7.00

9.40

July 09

5

 Learning (cont.)

7.00

9.40

July 11

6

Memory

Review for Midterm Exam

5

7.00

9.40

July 16

 

Midterm Exam

7.00

9.40

July 18

6

Memory (cont.)

6

7.00

9.40

July 23

9

Lifespan Development

7.00

9.40

July 25

10

Gender Role Development

7

7.00

9.40

July 30

11

Personality

7.00

9.40

Aug.1

11

Personality (cont.)

8

7.00

9.40

Aug.06

8

 Maslow-Self Efficacy

7.00

9.40

Aug.08

13

Health, Stress, & Coping

9

7.00

9.40

Aug.13

15

Psychological Disorders

7.00

9.40

Aug.15

15

Psychological Disorders (cont.)

10

7.00

9.40

Aug.20

 

Review for Final Exam

7.00

9.40

Aug.22

 

Final Exam